From the IV Doctor to the Intensivist-Anaesthesiologist: preview of the Sir Robert Macintosh lecture Copenhagen 2018

From the IV Doctor to the Intensivist-Anaesthesiologist: preview of the Sir Robert Macintosh lecture Copenhagen 2018

Saturday 2 June,09h45-10h30,Hall A1

Professor Claude Martin (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Nord, Marseille, France) has the honour of delivering this year’s Sir Robert McIntosh lecture: Anaesthesia in the 21st century: from the IV Doctor to the Intensivist-Anaesthesiologist.

For the best medical practice, and the patient safety, all anaesthesiologists should be trained both in anaesthesia and intensive care,” explains Professor Martin. “In many surgical interventions, or in non-major surgical intervention conducted in high-risk patients, severe complications may occur during surgery.”

He will explain that anaesthesiologists may have to face severe allergic reactions, such as haemorrhagic shock, cardiogenic or septic shocks. Very rare but severe complications such as Takotsubo syndrome may also occur during any surgical intervention. “All anaesthesiologists must be able to take care of organ dysfunctions occurring during surgery. This may also be the case before or after surgery in the recovery room,” says Professor Martin.

He will say that, to offer the best level of care to the patient, all anaesthesiologists should be able to diagnose and treat this severe organ dysfunction in the perioperative period. This should be done according to the most recent knowledge relating to the practice of intensive care.

Professor Martin concludes: “Intensive care is not only for medical intensivists in the critical care units but also during anaesthesia in the operating theatres.  Of course, anaesthesiologists are intensive care doctors, but they are much more than that:  they are anaesthesiologists – intensivists.”